DREAM Researchers Participate in Round-table Discussion on Human Rights and Disability

""DREAM researchers, Ieva Eskyte, Anthony Giannoumis and Magdi Birtha participated in a round-table discussion titled Human Rights and Disability: between choice and control at Vytautas Magnus University in Kaunas Lithuania on 21st October. The event aimed to facilitate  discussion and raise awareness on the importance of disability studies and disability rights.

The round-table addressed the principles of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities stating,

Since the key message of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (2006) is that disabled people have to exercise all human rights and fundamental freedoms equally with non-disabled citizens, the purpose of the meeting is to discuss disability and human rights issues in different contexts. For instance, different models of disability will be discussed from Scandinavian, British and Lithuanian perspectives. In addition, the relation between accessibility, disability movement and private markets will be analysed. Special attention will be paid to disability research, ethics and methods.

Practitioners, scholars and graduate students from a variety of disciplines presented their professional and academic experiences in the field of disability and human rights.

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The full program included,

  • Welcome &  Some Thoughts about Social Sensitivity, Reciprocity & Dialogue. Dean prof. Jonas Ruškus of Faculty of Social Sciences
  • Vytautas Magnus University, People with Disabilities and the Right to Reveal Potential. Ieva Danilevičienė, Vytautas Magnus University
  • The impact of family and friends social support on accepting mobility impairments. Laura Alčiauskaitė, dr. Liuda Šinkariova, Vytautas Magnus University
  • A comparative case study of e-accessibility policy implementation in the United Kingdom, Norway and the United States. G. Anthony Giannoumis, The Norwegian Social Research Institute
  • Information provision in the mainstream private market: business practices and disabled customers’ realities. Ieva Eskytė, University of Leeds, Centre for Disability Studies, UK
  • Participation of persons with disabilities in policy and decision-making processes. Magdi Birtha, Centre for Disability Law and Policy, National University of Ireland, Galway

DREAM would like to warmly thank the conveners at Vytautas Magnus University for the opportunity to work together in realizing the rights of persons with disabilities.

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The African Disability Rights Yearbook has been published!

The first volume of the African Disability Rights Yearbook has been launched on 5 November 2013 by the Centre for Human Rights at the Faculty of Law, University of Pretoria. The Yearbook is the first peer-reviewed journal in the African region to focus on issues at the intersection between disability and human rights against the backdrop of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The African Disability Rights Yearbook will be published annually. The Yearbook is available online free of charge at: http://www.pulp.up.ac.za/pdf/2013_07/2013_07.pdf 

One of the DREAM ESRs, Magdi Birtha (CDLP, NUIG) has a chapter published in this very important publication:

‘Nothing about CRPD monitoring without us’: A case study on the involvement of the disability movement in policy-making in Zambia. 

 

Help DREAM respond to the public consultation on Article 9 – Accessibility of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

UN Human Rights Office of the High Commissioner Logo

UN Human Rights Office of the High Commissioner Logo

The DREAM network will be responding to the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities’ general comment on Article 9 – Accessibility.

We would be honoured if you would join with us in making this contribution to the Committee. Therefore we invite you to send a formal statement or informal comments, thoughts, ideas, etc. by November 15th to anthonyg@nova.no so that we can take advantage of this opportunity.

We will compile the comments and draft and distribute our response to the consultation in January 2014.

The general comment outlines the normative content, state obligations, and inter-sectional issues related to accessibility.

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to to leave a comment, and thank you for your contribution!

Developing Europe’s policy skills to advance disability rights

DREAM featured as success story by EU Directorate General for Research, led by Commissioner Máire Geoghegan-Quinn. The following is an excerpt of the story featured on the EU Directorate General for Research website.

Most Member States of the European Union (EU), and the EU itself, have ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD). However, while the Convention will mark a major advance both for disability rights and also for European business, the necessary changes to turn it from vision into reality will not happen overnight. Adopting the Convention imposes numerous legal obligations on signatories affecting many areas of daily life.

In the words of the DREAM (Disability Rights Expanding Accessible Markets) project coordinator, Professor Gerard Quinn of the Centre for Disability Law and Policy at the National University of Ireland (NUI), Galway: “EU Member States need a lot of new skills and competences to drive this forward.”

The article concludes stating with a quote from the DREAM project coordinator, Gerard Quinn.

“The researchers are already developing a common instinct for where the opportunities for change may lie, and indeed they are starting to create that space themselves. It is beautiful to watch,”

“The phrase I use to sum it up is ‘policy entrepreneurship’ – developing people who can really bring about change that transforms the lives of our citizens with disabilities,”

The remaining article may be found at the EU Directorate General for Research website.

Signed, Sealed and Delivered: WIPO Treaty for the Blind Sets Historic Precedent for Accessibility to Published Material

This article is a reprint of a story published at G3ict.

The Marrakesh Treaty to Facilitate Access to Published Works for Persons Who Are Blind, Visually Impaired, or Otherwise Print Disabled has officially been approved. A jubilant Abigail Rekas writes in from Marrakesh about this historic precedent that will now allow greater access to published material for persons with print disabilities.

The feeling here in Marrakesh is one of joyous relief. The tension and frustration over the last week at the WIPO Diplomatic Conference to Conclude a Treaty to Facilitate Access to Published Works by Visually Impaired Persons and Persons with Print Disabilities have melted in the hot Moroccan sun. Whether it was the heat or the words of Stevie Wonder, requesting that the delegates ‘Sign, Seal and Deliver’ a treaty to benefit blind and print disabled persons, delegates on both sides of the issue found flexibility and were able to compromise and deliver a consolidated draft text that was adopted by the Conference on June 27, 2013. It will be open for signature on June 28, 2013.

History has been made. This is the first international intellectual property treaty on user rights. Never before have exceptions and limitations to enable access been mandated. This treaty is a blending of Human Rights and Intellectual Property. It implements, for the very first time, the principle laid out in theInternational Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights Article 15(a) and 15(b), that everyone has a right to access cultural materials. It is a first step to realizing United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, Article 30 that intellectual property regimes should not be an unreasonable barrier to access to cultural materials.

Music icon Stevie Wonder urges UN forum to sign, seal, deliver treaty for visually impaired

Image: WIPO Director General Francis Gurry (left) and music legend Stevie Wonder in 2010. Photo: WIPO/Emmanuel Berrod

There were four concepts that almost prevented this treaty from coming into existence. The 3-Step Test, Commercial Availability, Digital Rights Management/Technical Protection Measures, and Translation were extremely tough knots to untangle. Thursday, June 27 these issues seemed almost insurmountable, and emotions were running high.

Fortunately the pressure to conclude a treaty forced flexibility from delegations and the facilitator appointed to address these issues was able to find compromise between the various positions. An excellent discussion of the resolution of these issues can be found at the webpage:http://infojustice.org/archives/30032.

This treaty is the culmination of the work of many passionate advocates, particularly of the World Blind Union, the Royal National Institute of the Blind andKnowledge Ecology International. They have been the face of the campaign for this treaty, and have spent years working with the delegations of various countries to create a text that actually enabled access to books rather than just paying lip service to the idea.

The Beijing Momentum coupled with what the representative of Group B called the Marrakesh Spirit (that of collaboration and cooperative attitude) and facilitated by the WIPO Secretariat has lead to the Marrakesh Treaty to Facilitate Access to Published Works for Persons Who Are Blind, Visually Impaired, or Otherwise Print Disabled. It has not been an easy road. The Representative of the Government of Morocco commented that this treaty is the first of a new generation of treaties and collective efforts.

The Miracle in Marrakesh was greeted with a standing ovation. Stevie Wonder will perform. This treaty will change the lives of the blind, visually impaired and otherwise print disabled persons around the world as it is implemented. The focus must now shift to implementation of this treaty and the active sharing of books across borders.

Source: G3ict

DREAM Early Stage Researchers presenting at NNDR Conference 2013

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Seven Early Stage Researchers from the DREAM network attended and presented at the Twelfth Nordic Network of Disability Research Conference in Turku, Finland 30-31 May 2013.

Keynote speakers at the conference included Eva Feder Kittay, Professor of Philosophy, Stony Brook University; Dan Goodley, Professor of Disability Studies and Education, University of Sheffield; Jan Grue, Postdoctoral Fellow in Linguistics, University of Oslo, Norway; and Kalle Könkkölä, Executive Director of the Threshold Association, Helsinki, Finland.

Over the two days, the ESRs presented abstracts and posters and got to meet various disability academics from around the world. The following is a list of each ESR and the title of their presentations:

  • Anna Arstein-Kerslake: An empowering dependency: Exploring the role of supported decision-maker.
  • Magdi Birtha: “Nothing about CRPD monitoring without us” – case study on the involvement of the disability movement in policy-making in Zambia.
  • Ciara Brennan: “Theorizing the economics of independent living: Commodification of human rights in Iceland in a Nordic context” with Rannveig Traustadóttir and “The CRPD, independent living and user-led personal assistance”.
  • Ieva Eskyte: Shopping Accessibility: between the ideal and the real.
  • Robert Huffaker: Legal Framework on eAccessibility: A legislation review.
  • Carly Toepke: Participation and inclusive education under the UNCRPD.
  • Betül Yalcin: Employer attitudes towards employment of disabled people: a comparative analysis in the European context.

Rune Halvorson, PI from NOVA, presented “New policies to promote youth inclusion in the labour market? Disability in the Nordic welfare states”.

Rannveig Traustadóttir, PI from the University of Iceland, presented “Implementing and monitoring the CRPD” and “Childhood disability, space, place and identity” and chaired the symposiums titled “Implementing the CRPD” and “Childhood and Disability”.

Active Citizenship and Fiscal Innovation

DREAM principle investigator Gerard Quinn reflects on the role of fiscal innovation in achieving active citizenship for persons with disabilities as a part of an EU funded project, DISCIT – Making Persons with Disabilites Full Citizens.

The video is closed captioned in English, and the transcipt is available for download in Word and PDF.