DREAM Launches Disability Rights Digital Bibliography

As a joint project between researchers at NUI Galway and DREAM, the Disability Rights Digital Bibliography seeks to provide a single point of contact for academic references in disability rights. The bibliography was compiled based on individual contributions from researchers in seven research institutions throughout Europe. The bibliographies were established based on the thematic interests of the researchers and represent a wide array of areas impacting disability in Europe and internationally. Each bibliography is available as an accessible Microsoft Word document as well as a Research Information Systems (RIS) format which can be imported into most reference management software applications.

  • All Bibliographies
  • e-Accessibility – Word / RIS
  • Disability Rights and the CRPD – Word / RIS
  • Disability Theory – Word / RIS
  • Indicators and Monitoring of Human Rights – Word / RIS
  • Legal Capacity – Word / RIS
  • Medicalization of Disability – Word / RIS
  • Methodology for Research Disability – Word / RIS
  • Non-Discrimination – Word / RIS
  • Treaty Interpretation – Word / RIS
  • Web Accessibility – Word / RIS

We want to encourage our users interested in contributing further to this initiative to contact Suzanne Doyle or Anthony Giannoumis

A permanent link to the bibliography can be found at NUI Galway.

Advertisements

Launch of the European collaborative portal on Assistive Technologies and inclusive solutions

ATIS4all logoThere is a growing concern throughout Europe about the difficulties faced by the organisations involved in the ICT Assistive Technology (AT) field. The ATIS4all collaborative portal is the result of an EU-funded project, which aims to benefit all the key actors in the chain value of ICT ATs and accessibility products (from research centres to the end-users). It is an open and collaborative portal that offers reliable information on ICT ATs, inclusive solutions and R&D initiatives, and fosters online discussion, exchange of knowledge, expertise and sharing of information among its different portal members. Continue reading

DREAM Early Stage Researchers presenting at NNDR Conference 2013

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Seven Early Stage Researchers from the DREAM network attended and presented at the Twelfth Nordic Network of Disability Research Conference in Turku, Finland 30-31 May 2013.

Keynote speakers at the conference included Eva Feder Kittay, Professor of Philosophy, Stony Brook University; Dan Goodley, Professor of Disability Studies and Education, University of Sheffield; Jan Grue, Postdoctoral Fellow in Linguistics, University of Oslo, Norway; and Kalle Könkkölä, Executive Director of the Threshold Association, Helsinki, Finland.

Over the two days, the ESRs presented abstracts and posters and got to meet various disability academics from around the world. The following is a list of each ESR and the title of their presentations:

  • Anna Arstein-Kerslake: An empowering dependency: Exploring the role of supported decision-maker.
  • Magdi Birtha: “Nothing about CRPD monitoring without us” – case study on the involvement of the disability movement in policy-making in Zambia.
  • Ciara Brennan: “Theorizing the economics of independent living: Commodification of human rights in Iceland in a Nordic context” with Rannveig Traustadóttir and “The CRPD, independent living and user-led personal assistance”.
  • Ieva Eskyte: Shopping Accessibility: between the ideal and the real.
  • Robert Huffaker: Legal Framework on eAccessibility: A legislation review.
  • Carly Toepke: Participation and inclusive education under the UNCRPD.
  • Betül Yalcin: Employer attitudes towards employment of disabled people: a comparative analysis in the European context.

Rune Halvorson, PI from NOVA, presented “New policies to promote youth inclusion in the labour market? Disability in the Nordic welfare states”.

Rannveig Traustadóttir, PI from the University of Iceland, presented “Implementing and monitoring the CRPD” and “Childhood disability, space, place and identity” and chaired the symposiums titled “Implementing the CRPD” and “Childhood and Disability”.

Active Citizenship and Fiscal Innovation

DREAM principle investigator Gerard Quinn reflects on the role of fiscal innovation in achieving active citizenship for persons with disabilities as a part of an EU funded project, DISCIT – Making Persons with Disabilites Full Citizens.

The video is closed captioned in English, and the transcipt is available for download in Word and PDF.

DREAM Fellow Presenting to NUI Galway Students

On 9 November 2012, I had the pleasure to present my current research topics to the Centre of Disability Law and Policy. I gave a presentation entitled “eAccessibiltiy: Legislation Review and Building the Business Case” where I laid out the underpinnings of two projects I am working on in the midst of PhD programme work.

In order to see the way governments push the state of eAccessibility implementation, this paper aims to set up a review of the eAccessibility legislation framework as it stands via the UNCRPD, EU, Member State (Ireland and Spain) level. The particular ICTs chosen for examination include websites, Self Service Terminals and mobile phone apps.

Building the Business Case involves my plan to interview companies to see how they implement (or not) accessible strategies in their business plans.

The link to the presentation is below:

DREAM publication of “How do social institutions influence E-Accessibility polices in the UK, US, and Norway?”

Improvement by Evaluation cover pageI’m happy to announce the publication this summer of my paper co-authored by Rune Halvorsen “How do social institutions influence E-Accessibility polices in the UK, US, and Norway?“. The paper is a peer reviewed publication published as part of the 8th International Conference on Evaluation for Practice: Improvement by Evaluation and published by the University of Tampere School of Humanities and Sciences Unit at University Consortium of Pori.

The article appears as part of Section III, International Comparative Approaches in Evaluation and the publication editors introduce the article as

[an analysis of] policy documents from the U.S., UK and Norway in order to investigate how national and supranational, policies balance and mediate regional and international economic and social needs in the context of E-Accessibility, regulated by the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

The results show that the different national policy traditions truly matter. The authors conclude by emphasizing the utility of judicial enforcement, the flexibility of providing a low threshold administrative complaint mechanism, and the importance of monitoring.

Of additional note is “The slippery slope of evaluation: Ethics, issues, & methodological challenges using the case study of a housing development” by JoDee Keller at Pacific Lutheran University which discusses the impact on various populations including persons with disabilities of public housing development in the United States Pacific Northwest.

Presentation at the ECPR Sixth Pan-European Conference on EU Politics

""I will be presenting a paper titled “How Social Institutions Impact E-Accessibility Policy” at the ECPR Standing Group on the European Union’s Sixth Pan-European Conference. It will be hosted by the University of Tampere, Finland from 13 to 15 September 2012. The Standing Group’s Pan-European Conference is the largest academic conference on the European Union in Europe and brings together scholars working on the European Union from all over the world.

""

The paper examines how social institutions (i.e. the differences in norms, values and procedures) impact the design and implementation of national and supranational policies to promote accessibility of information and communication technology (E-Accessibility). Based on original research currently in progress the paper presents preliminary findings based on a content analysis of policy documents from the UN and EU, and the US, UK and Norway.

The conference will feature Eleven sections

  • Theories of European Integration
  • EU Institutions and EU Politics
  • EU and Domestic Politics
  • Public Opinion, Party Politics and Interest Groups
  • Political Economy of the EU
  • EU Foreign Policy and External Relations
  • The EU and Conflict Resolution
  • The EU: Challenges and Reforms
  • Gender and Diversity
  • Immigration, Migration and Asylum
  • New Developments in Research on the EU

European Parliament hosts International Seminar on Genetic Discrimination

We are delighted to welcome this guest post from Aisling de Paor, a Ph.D candidate in the Centre for Disability Law and Policy at NUI Galway, and Irish Research Council for the Humanities and Social Sciences (IRCHSS) scholar. Aisling is a graduate of NUI Galway (BCL) and University College Cork (LL.M).  Aisling is qualified as a solicitor and specialized primarily in employment law.

""On 6th March 2012, Marian Harkin MEP and Phil Prendergast MEP hosted a seminar on the topic of Genetic Discrimination. The event was organised by the Centre for Disability Law and Policy, NUI Galway, in conjunction with the European Disability Forum, and took place in the European Parliament, Brussels.

This international seminar, which was chaired by Andre Gubbels (Belgian Ministry), was the first of its kind in the European Parliament and brought together a diverse range of leading experts in the area, with the objective of exploring the case for a European level response to protect the privacy of genetic information and to prevent genetic discrimination. The seminar highlighted the interdisciplinary nature of this area and focused on the interaction between genetic science, technology, ethics and the law, and in particular, how best to address this complex area. The event also looked at the challenges and practical problems that arise when attempting to regulate this area, as well as the transatlantic perspectives on the matter.

Speakers included Professor Ciaran Morrison (Centre for Chromosome Biology, School of Natural Sciences, NUI Galway), who illustrated the reality of rapidly advancing genetic science, and the potential of new genetic testing technology.  Professor Yann Joly (Centre of Genomics and Policy, McGill University, Montreal, Canada) outlined the ethical and legal implications arising from the use of genetic information by third parties, exploring the potential for genetic discrimination.

Professor Peter Blanck (Burton Blatt Institute, Syracuse University) examined the position in the United States and the Genetic Information Non Discrimination Act 2008, while setting the scene in a historical, sociological and political context. Dr Delia Ferri (Faculty of Law, University of Verona) presented the challenges and possibilities of legislating at European Union level, looking particularly at the privacy and non- discrimination approaches.

A roundtable panel composed of Pat Clarke (member of European Disability Forum Executive Committee/ President, Down Syndrome Ireland), Marian Harkin, MEP, Peter Hustinx (European Data Protection Supervisor) and Dima Yared (Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights) discussed the different perspectives for the way forward.

The Rapporteur’s Report was delivered by Dr Elise Muir (Maastricht University), who reflected upon the emerging consensus that genetic science is advancing at a rapid pace, and is becoming more accessible and more readily available to individuals and third parties. Dr Muir acknowledged that although advancing genetic research offers the potential to revolutionise health care and medical treatment, it could also result in problems and pitfalls with the misuse of sensitive genetic information.  Although a comprehensive European level response is needed in this area, to adequately protect genetic privacy and prevent the discriminatory use of genetic information (and also to avoid a parsimonious approach to the issue), care needs to be taken when considering the nature of the problem and the appropriate way forward.

Professor Gerard Quinn, Director of the Centre for Disability Law and Policy at NUI Galway, stated: “This is the Centre at its best. We exist to inform debate and have impact. Scientific advances are for the benefit of all and we must maintain public confidence.  The best way to do this is to have a European level debate about how to protect people against the abuse of genetic information. Because of this event, a unique partnership between the Centre for Disability Law and Policy and the European Parliament, there is now a genuine European-level debate that should hopefully generate a European-level response in time.”